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Plasticity Labs Raises $2.1M To Boost Employee Morale | TechCrunch

Eventually, Moss built a consumer app based on The Smile Epidemic. After an invitation to speak at SXSW, Moss decided to focus on creating a product for workplaces instead. The result of that was Plasticity, which was accepted into the HYPERDRIVE Accelerator and received $800,000 in initial funding from angel investors, HYPERDRIVE, BDC, The Mathematics of Information Technology and Complex Systems (MITACS), and the Laurier LaunchPad.

via Plasticity Labs Raises $2.1M To Boost Employee Morale | TechCrunch.

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N.F.L. Rights a Wrong, but Only After Further (and Further) Review – NYTimes.com

In a letter to team owners released on Thursday, Goodell wrote: “My disciplinary decision led the public to question our sincerity, our commitment and whether we understood the toll that domestic violence inflicts on so many families. I take responsibility both for the decision and for ensuring that our actions in the future properly reflect our values. I didn’t get it right. Simply put, we have to do better. And we will.”

via N.F.L. Rights a Wrong, but Only After Further (and Further) Review – NYTimes.com.

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Offbeat Craigslist Roomie Ads Are Weirdly Appealing – Communities – Boston.com

In order to make that Craigslist post as appetizing as possible, ad writers have to soften out some of the harder edges of their Allston or their Brighton or their Fenway crib. That closet-sized bedroom is “cozy.” That rust-rimmed kitchen sink? It’s “antiquated.”

via Offbeat Craigslist Roomie Ads Are Weirdly Appealing – Communities – Boston.com.

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12 Unexpected Things That Mess With Your Memory | TIME

You regularly ransack the house to find your keys. You suddenly can’t recall the name of your kid’s teacher. You made your six-month dentist appointment three months late. Sound familiar? Fear not: most forgetfulness isn’t anything serious, says Majid Fotuhi, MD, PhD, founder and chief medical officer of NeurExpand Brain Center in Luterville, MD and co-author of The Memory Cure.

via 12 Unexpected Things That Mess With Your Memory | TIME.

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DIY diagnosis: How an extreme athlete uncovered her genetic flaw | Ars Technica

So when her limbs started glitching, she did what high-level athletes do, what she had always done: she pushed through. But in the summer of 2010, years of gradually worsening symptoms gave way to weeks of spectacular collapse. Kim was about to head to Lake Superior with her husband, CB. They planned to camp, kayak, and disappear from the world for as long as they could catch enough fish to eat. But in the days before their scheduled departure, she could not grip a pen or a fork, much less a paddle. Kim, a woman for whom extreme sports were everyday pursuits, could no longer cope with everyday pursuits. Instead of a lakeside tent, she found herself at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

via DIY diagnosis: How an extreme athlete uncovered her genetic flaw | Ars Technica.

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The man who grew eyes | Mosaic

On the other side of the door, scientists in the Laboratory for Organogenesis and Neurogenesis are working on something that has fired the imagination of science fiction authors for many years. They are at the cutting edge of an emerging field: rebuilding the body by growing tissues and organs from stem cells. They hope to develop the next generation of therapies for a variety of debilitating human diseases, and unravel the mysteries of brain development.

via The man who grew eyes | Mosaic.

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Starbucks’ Pumpkin Spice Latte and Its Unlikely Triumph | Seattle Coffee | Seattle Met

SINCE THE PUMPKIN SPICE latte’s inception 11 years ago, customers have ordered more than 200 million, each topped with whipped cream and a parting shake of spices. It arrives while the summer sun still beats down hot over most of the country, but a combination of masterful marketing and a fan base with the kind of obsession usually reserved for pop stars has transformed this drink into a national harbinger of fall. 

via Starbucks’ Pumpkin Spice Latte and Its Unlikely Triumph | Seattle Coffee | Seattle Met.

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What Lies Beneath Stonehenge? | History | Smithsonian

Faint as the Avenue was, Vince Gaffney hustled along as if it were illuminated by runway lights. A short, sprightly archaeologist of 56, from Newcastle upon Tyne in northeast England, he knows this landscape as well as anyone alive: has walked it, breathed it, studied it for uncounted hours. He has not lost his sense of wonder. Stopping to fix the monument in his eyeline, and reaching out toward the stones on the horizon, he said, “Look, it becomes cathedralesque.”

via What Lies Beneath Stonehenge? | History | Smithsonian.

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The British Undercover Cop Who Went Too Far

She opened the paper: the Queen in Nottingham for her Golden Jubilee; bankers under scrutiny; wives and girlfriends of the England football team. Absent-mindedly, she continued to read. She barely glanced at an article titled “How Absence of a Loving Father Can Wreck a Child’s Life.” A few pages later, she came to a photograph of a smiling young man with bouffy brown curls that parted like curtains around his eyes. Even after twenty-five years, she knew the face’s every freckle and line.

via The British Undercover Cop Who Went Too Far.